Posts for: August, 2020

By Michael Glouse, DDS
August 27, 2020
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implant  
3BenefitsofDentalImplantstoReplaceMissingTeeth

Here's the bad news on the overall state of dental health in the United States: Over 120 million people have one or more missing teeth—roughly one American in three. But there's also good news: We can replace missing teeth with a number of effective restorative methods. At the top of the list are dental implants, highly regarded by dentists and patients alike as the most lifelike and functional tooth replacement system available.

Dental implants have been growing in popularity since their introduction in the 1980s. Their structural design and construction have continued to improve, giving patients even more options for implant-based tooth replacement.

To bring greater attention to the benefits of this popular restoration, the American Academy of Implant Dentistry (AAID) designated August as Dental Implant Month in 2016. In recognition, here are 3 of those benefits you might gain from choosing dental implants to replace your missing teeth.

Durability. Unlike other restorations such as conventional dentures or bridges, implants replace the entire root structure of the tooth. To be more precise, implants are a tooth root replacement in the form of a post imbedded securely in the jawbone. As the bone grows around and attaches to the implant, it develops a durable and highly functional hold that can last for decades.

Adaptability. Many people assume dental implants are used only to replace individual teeth, but implants can also support multi-tooth restorations. A few strategically placed implants can securely attach a partial or total bridge to the jaw, or provide added support for a removable denture.

Affordability. At first glance, an implant's initial cost places it at the high end of the scale for tooth replacement options. But because of their long-term durability and high success rate (greater than 95% still in place after ten years), implants may cost less in the long run than lower-priced restorations that may require repair or replacement sooner.

Although they have a wide range of applications, implants aren't suited for some dental situations. Because implants require a minimum amount of bone present in the jaw, for example, extensive bone loss might nullify them as a current option. Even in this case, though, grafting therapy to rebuild the bone could make it possible to place dental implants at some point in the future.

If you've recently lost a tooth or you have an older restoration you'd like to replace, dental implants might be a great option for you. Your first step is an initial exam and consultation to find out if this premier dental restoration is right for you.

If you would like more information about dental implants, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implants: Your Third Set of Teeth.”


By Michael Glouse, DDS
August 17, 2020
Category: Oral Health
NBAPlayersInjuryPointsOutNeedforMouthguards

Basketball isn't a contact sport—right? Maybe once upon a time that was true… but today, not so much. Just ask New York Knicks point guard Dennis Smith Jr. While scrambling for a loose ball in a recent game, Smith's mouth took a hit from an opposing player's elbow—and he came up missing a big part of his front tooth. It's a type of injury that has become common in this fast-paced game.

Research shows that when it comes to dental damage, basketball is a leader in the field. In fact, one study published in the Journal of the American Dental Association (JADA) found that intercollegiate athletes who play basketball suffered a rate of dental injuries several times higher than those who played baseball, volleyball or track—even football!

Part of the problem is the nature of the game: With ten fast-moving players competing for space on a small court, collisions are bound to occur. Yet football requires even closer and more aggressive contact. Why don't football players suffer as many orofacial (mouth and face) injuries?

The answer is protective gear. While football players are generally required to wear helmets and mouth guards, hoopsters are not. And, with a few notable exceptions (like Golden State Warriors player Stephen Curry), most don't—which is an unfortunate choice.

Yes, modern dentistry offers many different options for a great-looking, long lasting tooth restoration or replacement. Based on each individual's situation, it's certainly possible to restore a damaged tooth via cosmetic bonding, veneers, bridgework, crowns, or dental implants. But depending on what's needed, these treatments may involve considerable time and expense. It's better to prevent dental injuries before they happen—and the best way to do that is with a custom-made mouthguard.

Here at the dental office we can provide a high-quality mouthguard that's fabricated from an exact model of your mouth, so it fits perfectly. Custom-made mouthguards offer effective protection against injury and are the most comfortable to wear; that's vital, because if you don't wear a mouthguard, it's not helping. Those "off-the-rack" or "boil-and-bite" mouthguards just can't offer the same level of comfort and protection as one that's designed and made just for you.

Do mouthguards really work? The same JADA study mentioned above found that when basketball players were required to wear mouthguards, the injury rate was cut by more than half! So if you (or your children) love to play basketball—or baseball—or any sport where there's a danger of orofacial injury—a custom-made mouthguard is a good investment in your smile's future.

If you would like more information about custom-made athletic mouthguards, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Athletic Mouthguards” and “An Introduction to Sports Injuries & Dentistry.”


4DentalHealthAreasThatDeserveAttentionBeforeGettingBacktoSchool

The final quarter of the 2019-2020 academic year was like no other in modern history. Because of COVID-19, U.S. schools and colleges lay dormant as millions of students carried on their studies via distance learning. Whether the upcoming school year will be online or in-person, the end of summer is still a great time to make sure your family's dental health is on track.

Normally, dental care is one of several items that families focus on right before school begins anew. But even if school won't be resuming in the traditional sense, you can still put the spotlight on your family's teeth and gums.

Here are 4 dental care areas that deserve your attention before the new school year begins.

Re-energize daily hygiene. The break in routine caused by sheltering in place may have had a stilting effect on regular habits like brushing and flossing. If so, now's the time to kick-start your family's daily hygiene. Brushing and flossing remove disease-causing plaque and are essential to long-term prevention of tooth decay and gum disease.

Schedule a dental cleaning. Regular professional cleanings, generally every six months, are necessary to remove hard-to-reach plaque and tartar. Scheduling may have been difficult this past spring, but as life starts to get back to normal, be sure to return to regular dental visits as soon as possible. During appointments, we can spot small issues that if left undetected could cause bigger problems later on.

Reassess your family's diet. If the last few months have impacted your normal food choices, you may want to take a closer look at your family's diet and what effect it may have on dental health. Processed foods with added sugar contribute to the risk of dental disease. But a diet rich in fresh fruits, vegetables and low-fat dairy contains abundant nutrients for strengthening teeth and gums.

Seek special evaluations as needed. It's a good idea to have your child undergo an orthodontic evaluation around age 6: If they have a poor bite developing, early intervention could prevent or minimize it. And you should have your teenagers' wisdom teeth monitored regularly in case they're impacted or causing other dental problems—they may require removal in early adulthood or before.

Hopefully, this unusual interruption in education will soon become a distant memory. But even with the school routine being upended as it has, you can still take advantage of the end of summer to give your family's dental health a boost.

If you would like more information about back-to-school dental care, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Top 10 Oral Health Tips for Children.”




Contact Us

Glouse Family Dentistry

(417) 235-5155
800 E Cleveland Ave Monett, MO 65708